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be described as a flu epidemic. >> senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is live in ft. worth, texas, with what may be some good news. she has an early read on the new flu numbers that we're getting. elizabeth, what have you learned? >> the cdc every friday release the new flu numbers. i got an early look at them. as you said a little bit of good news. the flu activity in this country has gone down a bit. two weeks ago we were talking about 29 states having high levels of flu activity. now we're talking about 24 states having high level of flu activity. that is good news. now i want to talk about the numbers in a sightly different way. this gets confusing, so bear with me. we're seeing less flu in the united states, but it is spread out more. geographically it has spread out to more locations. so, to put that in terms of numbers, two weeks ago, 41 states were seeing widespread activity, meaning it was throughout various regions of their state. now 47 states say they're seeing flu in various regions of their state. so spread out more, but the actual number of people who are having flu
to bar u.s. human rights abuses. some say this is all evidence of a new cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william brodeur was an ambassador in russia, and was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitsky act. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. in response to that, when people try to stop it in any way, like sergei magnitsky, they get killed. what the act does is it creates consequences for the corrupt murdering kelp to crates running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. do you wish congress hadn't passed it? >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think mos
. >> elizabeth cohen is going to join us a little bit later on from our medical unit. she is going to have more about max schwolert's heartbreaking story, his case and this story in general. back after this. for only 1-cent after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> so we broke the news yesterday that president obama had plans to nominate his chief of staff, jack lew, for treasury secretary. now, the official announcement will be made at 1:30 p.m. eastern today. if confirmed, lew would succeed timothy geithner, the last member of the original economic team that took office four years ago. that was, of course, you'll remember, at the height of the world economic crisis. dan lothian joins us live at the the white house. boy, did you ever have the news yesterday. you were the first on the air with it. what's the reaction been, though. you know it doesn't take long before the knives comes out.
cold war. stephen cohen is a professor at nyu and william browder was his former employer and he is, of course, one of the biggest proponents behind the magnitski act. william, explain the importance of the act from your point of view? >> very simply, it is a piece of legislation which is sort of designed for the modern day problems of what's going on in russia. in russia, you have a regime which is basically out to steal as much money as possible from their own people. when people try to stop it in any way, like sergeis magnitsky, they get killed. the corrupt running russia today and creates consequences outside of russia by banning their visas and freezing their assets in america. >> steve cohen, you disagree with the magnitsky act. >> i do for many reasons, but as you said in your introduction i think moscow and washington are sliding into a new cold war, which would be very bad for national security and the magnitsky act further poisons the relationship. mr. browder is right to a certain extent, but not quite as simple as he says. even though this may be this act just a lot of w
, our senior medical correspondent, elizabeth cohen is in ft. worth, texas, and she's been tracking all three of these illnesses. i want to start with the most serious and the one creating the most headlines, this flu. so, we are seeing this slowdown that i just mentioned but the numbers are still high. put it in perspective for me, if you can today, elizabeth. >> reporter: do you know what, ashleigh, if you look overall at the whole country, the numbers have gone down slightly, the amount of flu activity. however, do you know what, you really don't care what the flu's like halfway across the country, you care about what it's like where you live. so, in some parts of the country particularly the southeast, the numbers are going down. in other parts they're going up. this is very classic of a flu season. these numbers kind of go up and down. but, you know, what we're hoping is that this is sort of the beginning of flu overall going down. still lots of flu out there. still get a vaccine if you haven't gotten one already. >> is this sort of not, you know, overstated about getting the vacci
't have to be as concerned. my colleague, elizabeth cohen is reporting, a person in the their teens, ended up dying. it's not to be an alarmist. this could be presented and if addressed earlier enough can be treated. doesn't mean rush to the hospital by any answer o means but know the symptoms and if they get bad, do go. >> dr. gupta, thank you so have. >>> for numbers on the job front. 371,000 people filed first-time claims last week. up $4,000 from the week before. this is the first unemployment report, by the way, of 2013. when it comes to ending gun violence, vice president joe biden, made it very clear, if congress doesn't pass new gun laws, the president could go it alone as in bypass congress, and issue an executive order. >> the president is going to act. there are executive orders -- executive action that can be taken. weefbt decided what that is yet but we're compiling it all with the help of the attorney general and cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is require. >> they took his words as a threat. saying it's tripping them of their second ahelpment rights.
a public health emergency. elizabeth cohen joins us now. what do health officials mean when they use the word epidemic? >> it gets very technical. i'll boil it down here. basically, people are getting sick and dying from the flu in certain numbers. when those numbers get high enough, we call it an epidemic. i personally don't really care that much about that word. i'll tell you why. the flu season nearly always reaches epidemic levels. even if it's just like a moderate plain old, you know, normal season. so i think we shouldn't get focused too much on that word. we instead should focus on what we're seeing here which is what can you do to avoid getting the flu which is getting a flu shot and doing things like washing your hands and staying away from people who look sick. john? >> it doesn't feel like just a normal flu season here. i have to tell you. a lot of people sick here in the office. a lot of people sick where i live. governor cuomo declared a public health emergency. so since we're talking about terminology, what does that mean? >> let me go back to what you said before. this
out nationwide. we will talk more about this flu and the spread coming up with elizabeth cohen in the next hour. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine? >> never too late. >>> vice president biden revealing the white house is prepared to bypass congress to push through tough new gun control laws. that announcement coming hours before today's talks between biden's gun violence commission and gun rights groups, including the national rifle association. it is shaping up to be a long day for the vice president. later this morning he meets with sportsmen and wildlife groups. this afternoon it's representatives from gun owners groups, including the nra. tonight the entertainment industry weighs in on how violence in the media may be influencing the problem. when it is all said and done biden acknowledges his boss is prepared to use the powers of the presidency to enact his own comprehensive gun control plan. >> the president is going to act. there are executive orders, executive action that can be taken. we have not decided what that is yet. we are compiling it all with the help of t
. >> the hospital says the health and safety of the patients is the top priority. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> this nurse she treats some of the sickest patients and if they get the flu there could be some serious health consequences. >> right, if you or i get the flu it's unpleasant, we're out of work for a couple of days or maybe a week, we don't feel well but we're probably not going to die but when someone is that sick in the hospital or in a hospice, if they get the flu, they could die and in fact 36,000 people a year die from the flu, so it's a serious thing for these patients. >> so this hospital has this mandatory policy. is this becoming more common? >> it is becoming more common because the only protection really for these very sick patients, of course they get the flu shot themselves, but it's so surround them with people who have also been vaccinated, so before around 2005 hospitals didn't really care so much, they didn't really push this, but then they started to push it and look at these numbers. it really tells you s
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
. >>> better news this morning about the flu. cnn's elizabeth cohen got a look at new numbers out from the cdc, numbers set to officially be released later today. the number of cases are actually down with 24 states reporting high levels of flu last week, compared to 29 the week before. however, there were two more pediatric deaths, bringing the total to 20 and by pediatric deaths we mean children of course. in chicago, flu patients are overwhelming the city's already strained hospitals though with still quite the outbreak there. here's cnn's ted rowlands. >> no nausea at this point. >> reporter: deborah cross started feeling sick on monday, three days later she ended up in the emergency room at cook county hospital in chicago, where it was so busy, she had to wait four hours to be seen. >> decided to be safe and come here make sure that everything was okay. >> reporter: several hospitals in chicago this week were forced to reject patients for several hours because of so many flu cases. on monday, 11 different hospitals in the chicago area couldn't handle any more patients. non-life-threatenin
. pros and cons of being slightly overweight. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spells them out next. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> this story is for me and probably everybody watching. if you packed on a couple of extra pounds over the holidays, excuse me, you might not have to worry so much about it. according to a new study, being a little overweight might help you live longer. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. i'm going to live to be 150 then. >> oh, please. you're one of the most fit people i know. >> it sounds counterintuitive. help us understand this. we can ditch our diet. >> we have been preached at all thes
correspondent elizabeth cohen has a special airing tonight on 25 shocking medical mistakes. and she joins me now. elizabeth, this is you know, it's trouble withing to say the least. >> it is trouble withing. it's not just a hypothetical. i did this special because of mistakes that had happened in my own family. so this can really happen to people and this new study out from johns hopkins puts numbers on it. take a look at these numbers because it makes you go, oh, my goodness. i don't think people realize this. wrong procedures, the wrong procedure is when you go in for a ton sellecktomy and they give you an appendectomy. that happens to 20 patients a week in this country. 20 patients a week have the wrong procedure. now, same number of patients, 20 patientses a week have an operation on the wrong body part. you go in to have your right knee replaced and they replace your left knee. wrong sided surgery. and in addition to 39 patients a week, they have tools surgical tools left in their body. and are sewn up. and yet you have to know these things going in so that you can be prepared. >> i mean, y
after you see how many calories are packed into some popular restaurants. elizabeth cohen is live in atlanta. how many calories are we talking about? >> an enormous amount. in one dish, you're getting calories should you get in an entire day. i think americans expect fast food is high caloried. i think you don't get that even in a nice restaurant, sometimes you're getting even more calories. take a look at two dishes. this one right here is cheesecake factory he's bistro shrimp pasta. 3120 calories. >> did you say 3,000? >> yes. that's a 3. yes, you heard that right. and you're supposed to get about 2200 calories a day. so it's way more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. as a matter of fact, that one dish is the equivalent calorie-wise of 5 1/2 big macs. you would never sit down and eat 5 1/2 big macs, but that's what's in this dish. and let me show you another one. this is called veal porter house and crispy red potatoes and that has 2710 calories. again, more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. it is the equivalent of three pints of ben and juerry's ice cr
. sanjay gupta is in atlanta. what are you expecting to hear? >> elizabeth cohen has been working through the night on getting these numbers. one number, which is important and what we expected. widespread outbreak of the flu. 47 states, up from 41 states with an outbreak of the flu. some good news. the number of states with high levels of activity has gone down from 29 now to 24. two additional deaths in young people, from 18 to 20. but there may be some relief as you say in sight. we are at epidemic threshold. that basically means we are seeing more cases than we expected to see at this time year. big question? will those cases stay elevated or will they start to come down across the country? >> we keep hearing, get a flu shot, get a flu shot. some got our flu shots early. yes, i'm gloating. if you haven't gotten your flu shot yet, is there enough vaccine? >> i think so. i crunched some numbers on this overnight. may be some spot shortages, but general numbers, take aook at how many of these vaccines were specifically manufactured, 135 million, bottom number, 112 million vaccinated. not
. >> what you can do to not become a victim. i'm elizabeth cohen. i'll show you how to become an empowered patient. with the help of world renowned patient safety expert dr. peter pronovost, dr. otus brawley, dr. abraham varageis and more. stay tuned. this hour could save your life. >> at numb 25, baby security breach. the woman in this surveillance video, jennifer latham tells her family she's expecting a baby when really she isn't. so she decides to steal one. take a look as she changes into nursing scrubs, enters a baby's room, comes out with a bag under her arm. a baby is in that bag. the imposter nurse actually gets off the premises with the child, despite an alarm on the baby. >> the alarm went off as it was supposed to. the woman just managed to get out the door. >> the baby is gone, missing, for almost 2 1/2 hours. until a police officer spots the getaway car and pulls the baby snatcher over. >> that's a newborn you got back there. >> listen as jennifer lies to the officer telling him the baby is hers. >> you gave birth? today? >> no. yesterday. >> yesterday? >> this cop isn't buyi
'm elizabeth cohen, and i hope this hour makes you an empowered patient. >> headline makers. >> this is more important than any election. >> i was the perfect candidate. >> what is mitt romney isn't the best person? >> it is ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think that homo sexuality is a sin? >> i think it is unnatural. >> did you wake up this morning and have a quick, you know? >> i probably d id. >> "piers morgan tonight -- the news makers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers. the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. the world leaders, lawmakers, celebrities. and people who never expected to find themselves in the spotlight. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, new jersey governor, chris christie. in the wake of the superstorm sandy, he found himself in a bit of political hot water for making nice with president obama. >> good eveni
cohen, and i hope this hour makes you an empowered patient. >>> do you trust ahmadinejad. >> on this i don't. >> if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates? >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person? >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people is really a foreign idea. >> and more. >> it's ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think homosexuality is a sin? >> i think that it's -- it's -- it's unnatural. >> did you wake up this morning and have a quick, you know? >> i probably did. probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight -- the news makers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers. the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. the world leaders, lawmakers, celebrities. and people who never expected to find themselves in the spotlight. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from
again. like hagel, william cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he'll face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, wait, we have some pretty talented people that are -- could step in at a moment's notice and fill that spot. and the republicans will say, why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made, like reference to a jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists, i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> others insist hagel is not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a sort of tough minded -- in this case republican view of israel. that in fact accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: and critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998, hagel opposed james hormel an openly gay man to
is a lot safer. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins me now to explain. what are we talking about in terms of rules? you think they should be there, wouldn't you? >> you would think they definitely should have already been there and safety advocates have been begging for these for years and thrilled the fda doing the basic things. better measures to keep animals out of fields where crops are growing because what they do in fields? poop in fields. we don't want that. better rules to get farm workers to wash their hands and the last one, little gross but i have to say it. okay? got to say it. which is, port-a-potties for the work earls because when they don't have them, what do they do? >> come on. no way, elizabeth. that's not already a regulation? >> no, no. there aren't strict rules like the rules doing here. again, you can see why safety advocates so frustrated because some of the things are so basic. and they're hoping these will be fully implemented. we have done the segments, peanuts, spinach. they seem to go on and on. >> in fact, i was going to bring that up.
widespread this epidemic has become? we're going to talk with elizabeth cohen at the top of the hour. would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. >>> our starting point one month later, we're live this morning from newtown, connecticut, marking one month since 20 first graders and 6 staffers were gunned down inside the sandy hook elementary school. this morning we take a look at how the community is coping today and their plans to help prevent another tragedy. >>> then a flu especialpidemic widespread across 47 states with vaccines running low. where we stand and what you need to know to protect you and your family. >>> plus hollywood celebrates its own at the golden globe awards. we've got the surprises and the
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elizabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
activity. the yellow states have local activity. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now. this has been a bad season. i call it the whoop, when i hear that cough, i go you got the whoop. >> and you get away as quuckly as possible. >> you smile and back out of the room. >> how bad has the flu season been? >> it's been one of the worst flu seasons in the past decade, maybe only two or three has been as bad as this year. flu can hit early, like in november, december, which is what happened this year, or it can hit later, like january, february, or even later like march and so this has been a really early flu season. not a terrible flu season, but an early flu season. >> now, because it's so early, does that give us any indication how bad it will get? >> i was talking to folks at the cdc last night, and they said, look, we think it will be a moderate to severe season overall. so, worse than last year but not as bad as some other years. >> when i hear that whoop somewhere in this building -- >> i heard it many times in this building. >> i think i didn't get a flu shot. is
israeli prime minister ariel sharon is active. coming up next, elizabeth cohen explains what this could possibly mean. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food differently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ male announcer ] engine light on? come to meineke now for a free code scan read and you'll say...my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> after seven years in a coma, former world leader is now showing signs of brain activity. ariel sharon became prime minister of israel back in 2001. he was a major player in the 2003 talks, called for a palestinian state, but then in 2006 he suffered a massive stroke and brain hemorrhage that put him in a vegetative state. well, today his doctors say that sharon appeared to respond to his son's voice
to cut back, josh cohen blames fiscal cliff negotiations for throwing a wrench into his plan to expand his franchise. he started a business to remove junk from homes and businesses and now has about 50 employees. >> i'm just frustrated and angry. and i just want to move on and grow our business. and help to support the economy and all of the people that we employ. but instead, again, we're just kind of on hold here. >> with so many sectors of the economy bracing for financial pain, patience has worn thin among americans filing i reports like missy, of fayetteville, arkansas. >> this fiscal cliff mess shows how incredibly out of touch you are with the way people really live in this country. you are off in lala land, and eve everyone is saying how you're asking like spoiled brats who are more interested in being right than doing the right thing and representing the people who elected you. >> mary snow, cnn, new york. >> more interesting, being right than doing the right thing for your country. cnn's coverage of the fiscal cliff continues right after this.
at this. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from one of the southern states in atlanta. i hope you are feeling okay to do the segment. >> i can't even tell you how many people who i know who were sick with flu or flu-like illness. >> including me. >> and you're up there. >> and i'm up here and i didn't get the flu shot and i don't get it every year. >> ashleigh, did i teach you nothing? >> do you know what, you're brilliant and i'm busy. >> you're very sweet. next year i'm flying up there. >> just how bad is it? is it any different, i always say it's so bad this year, i feel like i say the same story every year. is it something different? is the strain different? >> no, what is weird or a little different is it started early. when you look at the past ten years, there were only two, maybe three seasons where we saw this much flu this early and it kept growing and growing. so, the cdc just a couple of hours ago came out with new numbers i'll share with you, ashleigh, if you look at last week, there were 29 states that had high levels of flu. the week before th
life. >> reporter: elizabeth cohen, cnn, ft. worth, texas. >> thanks for watching, everyone. "cnn newsroom" continues now with martin savidge. you can pick it up from here. >> thanks very much. >> sure. >>> 12:00 p.m. on the east coast, 9:00 a.m. on the west coast. i'm martin savidge in for fredricka whitfield. if you are just tuning in, thank you very much for joining us. these are the top stories we're following right now in the "cnn newsroom." it could be one of the most shocking admissions in sports history. "usa today" is reporting that lance armstrong will admit to doping in an upcoming interview with oprah. we're following that story. >> i said it for seven years. i've said it for longer than seven years. i have never doped. i can say it again. but i've said it for seven years. it doesn't help. >> reporter: help may be something lance armstrong will need a lot of to redeem his reputation after "usa today" reports armstrong will admit to doping throughout his career. the newspaper does not name their source but says it's a person with knowledge of the situation. "usa today"
or hanging out with andy cohen, sometimes thing on thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thank you for watching. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> the pentagon makes a bombshell announcement about women fighters. and apple shares plummet after hours. and, wow, it's cold out there. so let's talk about global warming. and hillary clinton gets heated. the man on the other end is our guest. guest. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, showdown over benghazi. secretary of state hillary clinton was on capitol hill today. she faced really tough questions from the senate and the house about the september 11th terror attack in libya that killed the united states ambassador and three other americans. >> we were misled that there were supposedly protests and something sprang out of that and that was easily ascertained that was not the fact and the american people could have known that within days. and they didn't know that. >> with all due respect, the fact is, we had four dead americans, was it
elizabeth cohen has been following up on this. i'm at an absolute loss. >> it's so hard to be those parents. so hard. you know, the american academy of pediatrics is officially against it. we reached out to autism speaks which is a big advocacy group which is big on autism and their families. they say there is currently no adequate scientific evidence to advocate the use of medical marijua marijuana. they're saying there's this family who's saying they had a good experience, other families who say they've had a good thing. >> other families. how many? is there a group? have they found each other? are they able to lobby? hey, listen. when there are controversial drugs being tested, and you're in fear of dying, you do anything. regardless of what the government says krks which is mann will continue to be a. >> right, so these families have found each other. the eckecles family did it. they're scattered, downline, talking to each other online. i don't think there's a formal lobby or anything. so they live in a state where marijuana is league, then they do what this family did and they try to s
with his family and all of a sudden became very ill. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spoke to his parents about their son's final days. >> the family was getting ready for a joyful christmas when on december 31st, 17-year-old son max started feeling sick. tired, fever. >> he never really got like super sick. >> two days later he was feeling better. played in the snow on vacation in wisconsin. celebrated christmas with his family. but christmas night, max felt sick again. >> excessive like 104.9 fever. we could not break it. >> the next morning, his parents took max to the hospital. where he was diagnosed with the flu. >> within 30 minutes, i mean the doctor was like something really wrong here. his kidneys are starting to fail. >> max was rushed by helicopter to a larger hospital. >> one of the last coherent things he said he looked at me and there were tears rolling down his face. >> he was scared >> he said, mom, i'm scared. >> i said i know, buddy. i am, too. then he saw me crying. he said mom, it's going to be okay. you're going to be okay. i love you. and that's really
to the clinton administration when president clinton invited william cohen, a republican to be defense secretary. then the obama administration, president obama asked robert gates, a republican to be defense secretary. then there was leon panetta. and now another republican, chuck hagel. what's wrong with democrats being defense secretary? >> right. actually, just as an historical footnote, roberts used to be a republican. you know, i think that there's a sort of feeling that each one of these can be justified. i think president clinton and cohen had a good relationship, as does president obama and senator hagel. in gates' instance, that made a lot of sense. so much was going on that you didn't want to have an immediate change in the defense. but that is true, that it looks like democrats always want to appoint republican secretaries of defense. also if you look at the history of the independent councils, they have almost all been republicans. and as a democrat i sometimes get frustrated, too. we can't find an independent council in our own party. i can understand the frustration but the preside
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
to the hospital. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us by phone from louisville, texas. we have you on the phone because we know you're working on a flu story about kids. give us a preview. >> it's a terrible story of a completely healthy 17-year-old boy who got the flu, you know, kids get the flu, it happens, but it did not, he got very sick, very quickly and unfortunately, he ended up passing away, and this is what sometimes happens with kids. kids can look completely fine, and in less than 24 hours, or about 24 hours later that child is on a respirator in the intensive care unit, and a lot of these kids are just completely healthy kids with no underlying health problems and we don't know why most kids are okay with the flu. they're sick for a little while and get better. some of them die, we just don't know why. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine to protect our kids, to protect ourselves? >> it isn't too late. that's one of two things i'll tell parents to do, to be empowered parents. this is so crucial. one, get your child the flu shot. we heard that people are still
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
. arizona put the most restrictions into effect, seven, and elizabeth cohen went back to texas where roe vs. wade, well, the decision began. we'll learn more about the decision fight today. >> reporter: roe vs. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand, the governor has made this vow -- >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality -- hi, it's elizabeth at cnn. >> great. come on in, ma'am. i'm at the whole woman's health clinic austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> any more ultrasounds? >> i don't think we have any more. >> rorter: amy started whole women's health ten years ago, and her business has grown. she has five clinics in texas, offering gynecology care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is provide an oasis for her where she feels safe, comfortable, at peace. >> reporter: the entire state 27,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
prohibited abortions except to save the mother's life. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen returned to the state where it all began and spoke to both sides. >> reporter: roe v. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand the governor has made this vow. >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality. it's elizabeth at cnn. >> come on in. >> reporter: i'm at a health clinic in austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> do we have anymore all t ultrasounds? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: she offers a care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is to provide an oasis where she feels safe and at peace. >> reporter: 72,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the u.s., nearly one in three women will have an abortion before the age of 45 according to the nonpartisan guttmacher institute. you have a lot more work to do? >> we have a lot more work to do
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
elizabeth cohen. that defies what a lot of people have thought in the past. what's the significance of this research? why is this? >> a lot of women and even some doctors think, hey, just take off the whole breast. a lot of doctors in the know will tell you, wait a minute. when someone's early stage breast cancer, stage one or stage two, lumpectomy plus radiation is the way to go. this study seems to support that. it suggests, it doesn't prove -- i don't want to use the p word. it suggests that having a lumpectomy and radiation is just as good or perhaps even a little better than having a mastectomy. >> i have a million more questions for you. i think the best thing would be for people -- you always say this -- ask your doctor first, right, elizabeth? >> ask your doctor what the options are. i've talked to so many women who have breast cancer and the doctor says let's do this. i say, well, did you ask him what other things you can do? there's almost always more than one option. if someone says i want to take your whole breast off, ask, what about a lumpectomy plus radiation? is that
correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us with more. >> this will really be interesting to see what they find here because nothing quite like this has ever been done. in essence, this is what they're thinking about doing. take 1,000 players and really follow them, look at their medical records, get measurements and look at all sorts of stuff, and then pick your 100 healthiest, and pick your 100 sickest, and then compare them, and one of the things that they will likely be looking for is how much does football have to do with it? are they sicker because they play a certain position or because they played for a longer period of time and talking about current players and former players and so this is something that's been negotiated and talked about. the nfl says nothing is more important than the health and safety of their players and if you're really into this, cnnhealth.com my colleague stephanie smith has a wonderful article. >> i was talking to two nfl players yesterday about concussions and one of them is going to donate his brain to science in essence and he said it's difficult to know exactly
of beverly hills talked about staking her dog jiggy to andy cohen's show "watch what happens live." >> jiggy was slurping from -- ice cube from a vodka tonic. >> andy cohen is a bad influence. >> jiggy was so jilled, he would fall asleep. >> he looks little hung over. >> jiggy is more of a social drinker whereas cleo drank for medicinal purposes. sometimes the only thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thanks for watching. that does it for us. "early start" begins now. >>> america on ice. from the midwest to mid-atlantic, subzero cold causes misery and takes more li lives. >>> the right to fight. for the first time the pentagon will allow women in combat on the front lines. >> that's huge news. >>> a defiant north korea threatening more nuclear tests and calling the u.s. its sworn enemy. that breaking overnight. good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. thursday, january 24th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. let's get started here. up first if you are still wrapped up in your blankets you may want to stay right where you are. >> do not mov
cohen joins us live from atlanta. all of the talk this morning. what are exactly the dangers of these drugs? >> let's talk about where these drugs come from and why people use them. let's start with human growth hormone, mentioned in the story. human growth hormone is something we all naturally have. made basically in our pituitary glands. what it can do, it can reduce fat and increase muscle mass. but some of the dangers are it can cause bone and muscle pain, diabetes and heart diseasor increase the chance you will get those. let's talk about testosterone, also mentioned in the story. testosterone, a hormone both men and women have. and some people say if you take it, you get bigger, leaner, stronger, and when you have a big workout, it enhances your recovery. makes it easier to recover. but here are some of the dangers. it can increase the chances of getting all sorts of things from sleep apnea to heart disease if a man already has prostate cancer, may grow that existing prostate cancer. >> like lance armstrong's case. is it illegal for doctors to give these drugs to athlet
, cheryl cohen greene around this time after the sundance film festival. >> my job is to help a person who is not sick or broken, just like all of us, myself included, to have a better understanding of their sexuality. we don't get a lot of good training and conversation when we are growing up about it and a lot of people come to their sexual feelings and desires from a sense of shame and embarrassment. >> for some viewers, i have to ask what is the difference between what you do and the oldest profession? >> well, my intention is very different. my intention is to not have clients come back. it's an education process that can be a lot of fun and it can be anxiety-provoking which is good because we work with the therapist around the anxiety that might be happening during our sessions. the focus is to help a person go out into the world feeling much better about who they are so they can share that with another person. >> i want to talk about the film. we mentioned the film based on your experience counselling this one man in particular. this poet, mark o'brien who got polio with a child and
anti-aging group. elizabeth cohen is in atlanta for us this morning. tell me a little bit more about these peds and exactly what the risks are for the players and what they could make them do. >> right, soledad there's a whole array of peds, performance-enhancing drugs. the miami report mentioned several but two, human growth hormone and testosterones. so let's go over both of those. human growth hormone is something that is natural that human beings naturally have, it helps kids to grow and the advantages or at least what some athletes would tell you the advantages are is that it reduces fat and increases muscle. however, the potential dangers are bone and muscle pain, diabetes and heart disease, testosterone also something obviously that's natural, both men and women have it. when you take extra testosterone, some athlete also tell thaw it also increases muscle mass, makes you smaller and makes it easier -- makes you stronger and makes it easier for to you recover after a big workout, but the potential dangers, sleep apnea, heart disease and also if a man already has prostate cance
of state -- at leas for now. massachusetts governor patrick naming william cohen, his former chief of staff to the crary of state submitted his resignation last night. microsoft founder bill gates speaking out about immigration. we'll hear from him next. campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] sounds good. can youlyric can.aid do this? lyric can. lyric can. lyric by phonak is the world's only 24/7, 100% invisible hearing device. it's tiny. but that might be the least revolutionary thing about lyric. lyric can be worn 24/7 for up to four months, without battery changes. call 1-800-414-5999 for a risk-free trial. cookie: there's absolutely no way anyone can see it even if they get right up to my ear. michael: wake up, go to sleep...showering, running, all your activities. lyric can also give you exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your heari
's leading beverage company, we can play an important role. >> very interesting. elizabeth cohen joining us now. what is the meaning of this new ad campaign. >> they haven't said a lot about obesity even though people have harangued them saying, wait a second, you're selling this product that might be contributing to obesity. they're trying to say, look, we're aware of this problem and we're doing our part. for example they point out we're selling smaller sizes of coke, 7.5 ounces instead of 12. they say we have nearly 200 lee-calorie and no-calorie products. they also say we're starting to put our calories, you can see it right here on the silver band, 140 calories so you know what you're getting. so they say that they're really trying to help people make choices. they're encouraging exercise and they really hopes this sort of quiets down some of their critics. >> we've been talking about america's obesity problems for years and years. and soda, consumption, i believe, has been going downer of the the last several years f my question is then how responsible is soda really? >> if you look a
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